Tag: 上海千花mm自荐


WICB to prioritise fast bowling


first_imgST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC): The West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) says it wants to stage a series of fast bowling camps as part of a plan to rekindle an area of the game that has been struggling in recent years. WICB director of cricket, Richard Pybus, made the announcement at the conclusion of the 10-round Professional Cricket League (PCL) Regional four-day Tournament on Monday. The WICB is pondering the introduction of an off-season training programme targeting fast bowlers after spinners dominated the just ended four-day tournament. “We are prioritising and looking at some camps for our fast bowlers, possibly some measures off season to prioritise fast bowling in the four-day competition,” said Pybus in an interview with WICB media. “This is going to be central to us getting that back at the heart of West Indies cricket again.” Spinners featured prominently during the tournament, including the top wicket- taker, Jamaican  spinner Nikita Miller, who had 65 scalps in nine matches. “The competition has been still dominated too much by the spin bowlers,” said Pybus. “That is something that we will have to seriously address during the off season to make sure that we are prioritising the fast bowlers.” Guyana’s Leon Johnson, with 807, scored the most runs for the season, followed by Devon Smith of the Windward Islands, who scored 719 — though from two matches less. Guyana’s Vishal Singh and Barbados’ Royston Chase were other players who scored over 700 runs. “I think something which is exceptionally positive is the quality of the batting. We are getting a consistency in the scoring,” said Pybus. “We got a core group of young players who have put their hand up all the way through the competition. We are getting consistent with hundreds being scored. Volume of hundreds and volume of runs which I think is very positive.” Guyana Jaguars were crowned champions of the R4Day for the second straight year. They finished with 149 points — seven clear of nearest rivals Barbados Pride — to regain the George Headley/Everton Weekes Trophy, symbol of regional first-class supremacy. “The first season of the PCL was very rushed and the systems we wanted to put in place to be able to support it were not where we wanted them to be,” he said. “So this year is closer to where I would like to see the system in terms of providing support to the players and the structure of the season regarding the off season programmes for the players.”last_img read more


Broncos player who returned to team this month steps away to recover


first_imgHUMBOLDT, Sask. — An injured player who returned to the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team earlier this month has decided to step away.Tyler Smith, who is 20, said in a social media post that he is thankful for all the support from the team, its fans and his billets for welcoming him back to Humboldt.But he says he has decided to step away from the team so he can continue his recovery at home.Smith suffered a broken collarbone, broken shoulder blade and nerve damage down his left arm when the team’s bus collided with a semi-trailer at a Saskatchewan intersection in April.The six-foot-one, 185-pound forward from Leduc, Alta., was one of three survivors who returned to the team this season.Smith joined in early November and played 10 games, recording one assist.His coach, Nathan Oystrick, thanked Smith for his dedication to the Broncos on and off the ice.“Tyler’s perseverance and commitment to being a part of our organization is inspiring to our Broncos family,”Oystrick said in a statement.“Smitty, I wish you all the best and look forward to following your success in whatever you choose to do.”The Canadian Presslast_img read more


Novak Djokovics Chase Of Tennis Records Is Speeding Up


Novak Djokovic isn’t just chasing the records of his sport’s all-time greats. He’s accelerating in his pursuit.After winning his first French Open title on Sunday, Djokovic holds all four major titles at the same time, the first man to do so since Rod Laver in 1969. He is halfway to winning all four in one year, leaving him closer to winning a Grand Slam than any man since Jim Courier won the first two in 1992.1Mats Wilander was the only man other than Courier to win the Australian Open and French Open back-to-back since Laver’s 1969 Grand Slam. Wilander did it in 1984-85 (back when the Australian Open was in December) and in 1988. He has won 12 major titles, just two behind Rafael Nadal and five behind all-time leader Roger Federer. And on Monday he will be No. 1 in the rankings by the enormous margin of 8,045 points, leaving him in a strong position to overtake Federer’s record for the most weeks at No. 1 as soon as 2018.History suggests Djokovic should be slowing down, not speeding up, at age 29. Even all-time greats have rarely won many major titles so close to 30. While the sport has become kinder to veterans, just two majors were won by a man 29 or older in the last decade: Federer, at Wimbledon in 2012; and Stan Wawrinka, over Djokovic at last year’s French Open. Three factors are speeding Djokovic’s chase:1) He’s playing outstanding tennis, the most dominant of the Open era. Our Elo ratings at the end of last year showed Djokovic topping all other men since 1968, an era that encompasses just about every contender for the greatest career of all time, though it omits many of Laver’s best years. More conventional stats confirm Djokovic’s dominance. Men’s tennis has three types of events that feature nearly all of the best players who are fit to play: the four majors, nine Masters and the World Tour Finals. Djokovic has reached the final of 21 of the last 22 of these events he has entered, winning 17 of them. No man has ever had a stretch that dominant.Andy Murray should be Djokovic’s biggest rival. Murray was born exactly a week before Djokovic, has an eerily similar game and has dealt him three of his biggest recent losses: in the finals of the 2012 U.S. Open and 2013 Wimbledon, and in the 2012 Olympics semifinal. But since Murray’s Wimbledon win, Djokovic has beaten him in 13 of their 15 meetings, including all five of their matches at Grand Slams. The reasons were evident in Djokovic’s defeat of Murray in Sunday’s final: In just about every facet of the game, Murray is great but Djokovic is greater. Murray has an edge in one scenario: When he’s lobbing the ball and Djokovic is smashing it. That doesn’t happen often enough to swing a tennis match.2) The men who used to hold Djokovic back when they were at their peak are fading as he continues to soar. If Federer and Nadal hadn’t been around, Djokovic probably would have won many more majors by 2010. He faced them 11 times at majors through the 2010 U.S. Open and lost nine of those matches. Since then, Djokovic has beaten them in 11 of 17 meetings at majors, including the last five. And he may not meet them many more times at majors, with both men struggling with injuries. Federer withdrew from the French Open before it began, and Nadal withdrew after the first two rounds.3) Djokovic doesn’t yet have any younger rivals. That is stunning for a man at age 29. Players younger than him have won just two majors combined: Marin Cilic and Juan Martín del Potro, both born a year after Djokovic, have one apiece. Neither has made more than one major final. And men born in 1989 or later have not won a single title of note. No major, no Masters, no tour final. The entire generation of men younger than Djokovic who should be leading the sport hasn’t lifted a single significant trophy. By this stage of the season two years ago — when he was the same age as the 1989ers — Djokovic by himself had won six majors, three tour finals and 19 Masters titles.This might look like a chicken-and-egg problem: Have players younger than Djokovic struggled because he is an all-time great who keeps ousting them, or because they’re not very good? The answer is a little of both, but more the latter. Djokovic has ousted men younger than him from Slams in the fourth round or later only 17 times in his career. None were in a final. The primary reason the younger guys aren’t breaking through isn’t because Djokovic keeps stopping them. It’s because other older guys are.While the men ages 23 to 28 might retire as a collective lost cause — a weird void in the tennis record books — the men younger than them show real promise, including Dominic Thiem, who will enter the Top 10 on Monday, and Nick Kyrgios. They will have to grow up in a hurry if they are to slow Djokovic’s run at the record book. At the moment, aging or injury look likely to be his biggest obstacle. read more


Police searching for suspect who stole pickup truck at gunpoint


first_imgPolice searching for suspect who stole pickup truck at gunpoint Posted: October 13, 2018 KUSI Newsroom October 13, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — A man was at large Saturday in a Toyota pickup truck stolen at gunpoint from a man in a San Diego neighborhood after he first tried to take a woman’s SUV, authorities said.The carjacking was reported at 6:13 p.m. at 3645 Lloyd Terrace, San Diego police Officer Robert Heims said.A 21-year-old woman was parking her Ford Expedition on the street when the suspect walked up to the passenger side window, pointed a gun at her and demanded the keys, Heims said. “The victim turned off the truck and threw the keys at the suspect then she got out of the truck and ran away.”The suspect recovered the keys, got in on the driver’s side and put the keys in the ignition but got out and walked to a house with an open garage, he said.The suspect pointed a gun at a man inside a garage and demanded his truck, Heims said. The victim handed over the keys and the suspect took the gray 2002 Toyota Tacoma truck with a ladder rack in the back. The California license number is 6Y93910.The suspect was described as Hispanic, in his late 20s, 6 feet tall, 200 pounds, with short dark hair and a short beard, wearing a dark hoodie, red shirt, dark pants and dark shoes, the officer said..Anyone with information was asked to call San Diego police at (619) 531-2000 or Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477. last_img read more




Recent Comments