Syria : Well-known Syrian citizen-journalist probably died in detention in 2013


first_imgSyria is ranked 174th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. April 19, 2019 – Updated on March 11, 2020 Syria : Well-known Syrian citizen-journalist probably died in detention in 2013 Toll of ten years of civil war on journalists in Syria Wave of Kurdish arrests of Syrian journalists RSF_en After being arrested by Syrian intelligence agents in Aleppo in March 2012, Othman was forced to make a “confession” that was recorded and broadcast on Syrian TV in April 2012. It included questions about his video reports, his relations with the participants in demonstrations, and his relations with foreign reporters. One of the managers of the media centre in the city of Homs at the start of the uprising in Syria in 2011, Othman gained prominence for his coverage of the Syrian government’s artillery bombardment of Homs and for helping foreign reporters. After his arrest, he became one of the many journalists to disappear in the government’s prisons. Organisation Othman described the bombardment of Homs in the many live interviews he gave to international TV channels with his face unconcealed. He also helped foreign reporters operating clandestinely in the city, including Marie Colvinand Rémi Ochlik, who were killed in an artillery attack on the Baba Amr media centre in Homs in February 2012. SyriaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Imprisoned Follow the news on Syria News Receive email alerts News SyriaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Imprisoned Newscenter_img Following the reports of Othman’s arrest in 2012, several western governments voiced concern and called for his release. Dozens of Syrian journalists are still missing in various parts of the country. In most cases they disappeared after being arrested by government forces. They remain missing although the Assad government, when issuing updated lists of civilian deaths last year, implicitly recognized that hundreds of missing persons, including journalists, had died in detention. Shiyar Khalil, a Syrian journalist who managed to get out of prison and leave Syria, has described the torture to which he was submitted in similar circumstances, and how his interrogators accused him of “fabricating false information against Bashar al-Assad and of being a terrorist.” “All possible light must be shed on the status of Ali Othman and the other journalists who disappeared after being arrested by the Syrian authorities,” RSF’s Middle East desk said. “The survivors must be freed without delay, the bodies of those who died in detention must be returned to their families, and those responsible for their death or execution must be identified.” March 12, 2021 Find out more News Edith Bouvier, a French journalist injured in the same attack who was smuggled out of Syria with Othman’s help, told Le Figaro when Othman was arrested that “he had expressed the fear that he could be accused of colluding with a hostile country – France – and that helping us to get free might cost him his life.” The fate of many journalists who were kidnapped in Syria by rebel armed groups, including Jaysh al Islam and Islamic State, is also still unknown. Damascus TV presenter arrested under cyber-crime law to go further March 8, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for an investigation into the status of Ali Mahmoud Othman, a well-known Syrian citizen-journalist who disappeared after arrest in 2012. His family was recently told he died in detention on 30 December 2013 and is seeking official confirmation of his death and the return of his body. February 3, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more


New prevention of criminality law poses threat to citizen reporting


first_imgNews News Receive email alerts FranceEurope – Central Asia Help by sharing this information Organisation RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story FranceEurope – Central Asia to go further Follow the news on France News Reporters Without Borders voiced concern today about a new French law on the prevention of criminality following its approval by the constitutional council on 3 March. “The sections of this law supposedly dealing with ‘happy slapping’ in fact have a much broader scope, and posting videos online showing violence against people could now be banned, even if it were the police who were carrying out the violence,” the organisation said.”We make no assumptions about the government’s intentions and we recognise the need to prevent the spread of ‘happy slapping,’ but this law introduces a dangerous distinction between professional journalists, allowed to disseminate images of violence, and ordinary citizens, who could be jailed for the same thing,” Reporters Without Borders continued.”It is particularly regrettable that the law would forbid the online distribution of images showing acts of violence by the security forces,” the press freedom organisation added.The law on the prevention of criminality, which was adopted on 13 February, was referred to the constitutional council by the socialist group in parliament. The referral did not specifically concern the section dealing with ‘happy slapping.’The law provides for sentences of up to five years in prison and fines of 75,000 euros for disseminating images concerning the offences listed in 222-1 to 222-14-1 and 222-23 to 222-31 of the criminal code. These offences range from acts of serious violence (“torture” and “acts of barbarity”) to ordinary physical attacks. Article 222-13 concerns violence “committed by an agent of the state in the exercise of his duties.”The law specifies that the ban “is not applicable when the recording or dissemination is the result of the normal exercise of a profession whose purpose is to inform the public or if it is carried out with the aim of serving as judicial evidence.”‘Happy slapping’ is a physical attack on a person carried out with the aim of obtaining a video recording of the attack, which is then circulated by mobile phone or posted on the Internet.Reporters Without Borders points out that all Internet users are now in a position to participate in the creation and dissemination of information. They are often the “recorders” of an event, especially thanks to mobile phones with photo and video capability, and can disseminate their own content online.These “citizen journalists” can play a role in monitoring the activities of the authorities throughout the world. In Egypt, for example, bloggers recently revealed a series of scandals involving the security services and showed, by means of video recordings made clandestinely in detention centres, that torture is still regularly practised in Egypt.In the field of human rights, it is them and not professional journalists who have been responsible for the most reliable reports and information – the information that has most upset the government. Reporters Without Borders thinks it would be shocking if this kind of activity, which constitutes a safeguard against abuses of authority, were to be criminalized in a democratic country.—————–Create your blog with Reporters Without Borders, and read our weekly blog review at www.rsfblog.org June 4, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders voiced concern today about a new French law on the prevention of criminality following its approval by the constitutional council on 3 March. “The sections of this law supposedly dealing with ‘happy slapping’ in fact have a much broader scope, and posting videos online showing violence against people could now be banned, even if it were the police who were carrying out the violence,” the organisation said. March 8, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 New prevention of criminality law poses threat to citizen reporting Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says News June 2, 2021 Find out more RSF_en May 10, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more


Myanmar Times and other media threatened and sanctioned by military censors


first_img Reporters Without Borders and the Burma Media Association condemn the recent sanctions taken by the military government’s censorship board against the Burmese-language edition of the Myanmar Times weekly, which was ordered to suppress its next issue for carrying a report about an increase in the price of satellite dish licences (http://www.mmtimes.com/no400/n006.htm) in its 11 January issue.The newspaper apparently published the story, which quoted an Agence France-Presse dispatch, without requesting the censorship board’s permission.”The latest sanctions against news media that are already subject to censorship and self-censorship appear to be linked to recent official statements on press freedom,” the two organisations said. “Information minister Kyaw Hsan, for example, told a group of media publishers on 13 January that the media must make an effort to help the national economy to improve and to protect itself against the destructionists threatening the country’s interests. We suspect that this kind of comment may pave the way for new sanctions and restrictions.”A Rangoon-based journalist said the government also asked the Myanmar Times to fire four of its journalists, Nwe Nwe Aye, Win Nyunt Lwin, Myint Soe and Win Kyaw Oo. The four were reportedly told to go this week.The censorship board recently ordered at least two magazines, the Myanmar Tribune and Action Times, not to publish any “political” news. A journalist employed by one of these publications said Maj. Tint Swe, the head of the censorship board, threatened them with reprisals if they did not concentrate on entertainment and sport. Myanmar Tribune and Action Times decided to temporarily suspend publication.A spokesperson for the opposition National League for Democracy (NLD), Aung San Suu Kyi’s party, was summoned by the censorship board on 11 January and reprimanded for issuing a newsletter on 4 January, Independence Day. Reference was made to the Printers and Publishers Registration Act, under which an unauthorised publication is punishable by up to seven years in prison.According to the Burmese exile magazine Irrawaddy, young NLD activists printed and circulated a newsletter entitled Ah-Yoan-Thit (The Dawn) containing articles on last September’s demonstrations and arrests of party activists.The military government has refused to give the NLD any publication permit since the start of the 1990s. Aung San Suu Kyi has herself repeatedly requested authorisation to publish a newspaper.Around 150 weekly newspapers and 80 magazines are published in Burma. Most of them do not cover politics but all of them are subjected to prior censorship. According to some sources, rampant corruption within the censorship board means that publications are sometimes able to carry reports that would normally be censored. Follow the news on Myanmar US journalist held in Yangon prison notorious for torture RSF_en Receive email alerts May 12, 2021 Find out more Organisation News January 16, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Myanmar Times and other media threatened and sanctioned by military censors Help by sharing this information RSF asks Germany to let Myanmar journalist Mratt Kyaw Thu apply for asylumcenter_img MyanmarAsia – Pacific to go further May 31, 2021 Find out more News MyanmarAsia – Pacific May 26, 2021 Find out more News Thai premier, UN rapporteurs asked to prevent journalists being returned to Myanmar Newslast_img read more


30-month jail term for editor in libel case brought by lawyer


first_imgNews Editor still unable to return to Bolivia after six months in exile The 30-month jail sentence that a La Paz court imposed on Rogelio Vicente Peláez Justiniano, the editor of the monthly Larga Vista, on 4 March on charges of defamation and “dissemination of insults” has highlighted the urgency of decriminalizing media offences in some countries of Latin America.Article 27 of Bolivia’s publishing law stipulates that these offences continue to be covered by the criminal code. Peláez could have chosen to be tried under the publishing law or the criminal code, each of which would have involved a different court. He chose the criminal code and now plans to appeal against his conviction.“The sentence is not final and could change,” Reporters Without Borders said. “But it poses a challenge to Bolivia’s legislators. The criminalization of media offences violates the American Convention on Human Rights, which Bolivia signed, and fosters censorship and self-censorship by journalists who cover matters of public interest, as in this case.“A jail sentence in a libel case is both wrong in principle and counter-productive in practice. It does nothing to correct or redress the information that has been reported or the opinions that have been expressed, and it just reflects badly on those who issue the sentence or give it their approval.”The case against Peláez was filed in October 2010 by Waldo Molina Gutiérrez, a lawyer repeatedly been accused by Larga Vista of “illicit enrichment” for demanding fees of more than 450,000 dollars for representing 285 people who had contributed to the formerly state-run State Employee Retirement Fund (FREP). A criminal court ruled in November 2008 that Molina could collect these excessive fees, which he received in July 2009. It was then that Larga Vista began covering the case.Peláez told Reporters Without Borders that the court that convicted him had made no attempt to shed light on the substance of the corruption allegations against Molina. A jail sentence in this kind of case is rare in Bolivia and, according to some local and national media, is unprecedented.Welcome decreeThe double murder of two Aymara-language journalists – Verónica Peñasco Layme and her brother, Victor Hugo Peñasco Layme – in La Paz on 25 February meanwhile continues to reverberate within the media and beyond. At least five street demonstrations have been staged in response to their murders, the motives of which are still unknown.Reporters Without Borders welcomes a government decree ordering the media to provide transport for their employees between home and work during the hours of 10 at night to 7 in the morning. According to the decree, which took effect on 29 February, media that fail to comply will be fined, with the amount of the fine being paid to the journalist concerned. RSF_en News Help by sharing this information Organisation BoliviaAmericas Receive email alerts Covid-19 emergency laws spell disaster for press freedom March 15, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 30-month jail term for editor in libel case brought by lawyercenter_img to go further Follow the news on Bolivia June 12, 2020 Find out more BoliviaAmericas Bolivian journalist hounded after accusing boss of sexual harassment February 1, 2018 Find out more November 18, 2016 Find out more News Newslast_img read more


Reporters Without Borders profoundly shocked by arson attack on satirical weekly


first_img Organisation “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says Receive email alerts News FranceEurope – Central Asia Reporters Without Borders is deeply shocked by the firebomb attack that devastated the premises of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in Paris in the early hours of yesterday. “It is extremely worrying to note that in France there are individuals who are prepared to lash out in such a violent manner against a newspaper for making use of its freedom of expression. Reacting in this way only serves to increase tension and ignorance of all kinds,” said Jean-François Julliard, secretary-general of the press freedom organization, immediately after the attack.“Seven years to the day since the murder of the Dutch filmmaker Theo Van Gogh, on 2 November 2004, there is still a high risk that religion could become a taboo subject.“We are extremely worried. Today, Charlie Hebdo is set on fire for having published a caricature of Mohammed, while yesterday and every day since 20 October, Christian fundamentalists have been protesting outside the Théâtre de la Ville to disrupt a play they regard as blasphemous…. “These actions are intended to intimidate journalists and artists and force them into self-censorship. We must redouble our vigilance.”Fire broke out in the offices of Charlie Hebdo in the 20th arrondissement of Paris in the early hours of yesterday. It was caused by a Molotov cocktail thrown by unidentified attackers about 1 a.m. There were no injuries. In addition, the weekly’s website was hacked and its home page replaced with a photograph of Mecca under the slogan “There is no other god but Allah.”The editorial staff believes the attack is linked to a special edition of the magazine published yesterday, which was re-named Charia Hebdo, a reference to Sharia Islamic law, and showing a caricature of the Prophet Mohammed promising “one hundred lashes if you don’t die of laughter.” “I certainly was not expecting a reaction of this magnitude,” the editor, known as Charb, told Reporters Without Borders.“Of course, Charlie Hebdo will carry on as before. But for now our premises are covered in soot and unusable. The computers are wrecked, although the hard disks seem to have been saved.“Reporters Without Borders has meanwhile offered Charlie Hebdo’s editorial team temporary accommodation in its own offices. News Help by sharing this information RSF_en June 2, 2021 Find out more News May 10, 2021 Find out more (Photo: DR/AFP) November 3, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Reporters Without Borders profoundly shocked by arson attack on satirical weekly Follow the news on France Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU to go further RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story June 4, 2021 Find out more News FranceEurope – Central Asia last_img read more


Governement bill seen as opening way to online censorship


first_img Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts IraqMiddle East – North Africa News News Reporters Without Borders is very concerned about a new culture ministry bill that aims to ban certain websites as its scope is too vague and it needs to be more clearly defined. The bill is due to be examined by parliament shortly.“We are very worried about the abuses that will be possible under this bill as a result of vague and imprecise wording,” Reporters Without Borders said. “It is legitimate to want to regulate the Internet sector but it would be unacceptable if this proposed law were to restrict freedom of information.”The government wants to step up control of website content and Internet cafés. “All websites that glorify terrorism and incite violence and sectarianism, or those that violate social morals with content such as pornography will be banned,” communications ministry spokesman Sameer Al-Hasoon was quoted as saying. Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” The Iraqi Journalistic Freedom Observatory said the bill would open the door to tighter control of political debate and issues that are regarded as sensitive by the government.The proposed law has been fiercely criticised, especially by free speech groups which see it as a first step towards political censorship and a threat to the democratic process in Iraq. Prime Minister Nouri Al Maliki has also voiced concern that it violates articles 38 and 40 of the 2005 constitution. Internet café owners say the proposed controls could slow down the Internet and jeopardise online searches and chat forums.Meanwhile, there has been an increase in attacks on Internet cafés in recent months. Around 10 people were wounded in the bombing of an Internet café in the southwest Baghdad district of Saha on 16 July that was claimed a religious extremist group.Iraq has benefitted from favourable free speech legislation since Saddam Hussein’s overthrow in 2003. Several dozen Internet Service Providers have been established and hundreds of Internet cafés have been opened throughout the country. All this could be threatened by the new bill. December 28, 2020 Find out more IraqMiddle East – North Africa RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” December 16, 2020 Find out more to go further News Follow the news on Iraq RSF_en Organisation Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan News August 10, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Governement bill seen as opening way to online censorship February 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more


Call for release of two journalists, investigation into conditions of detention


first_img News Organisation News August 25, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Call for release of two journalists, investigation into conditions of detention Ethiopia arbitrarily suspends New York Times reporter’s accreditation EthiopiaAfrica News RSF_en EthiopiaAfrica February 10, 2021 Find out more Photo : Meles Zenawi (AFP) to go further May 21, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information RSF condemns NYT reporter’s unprecedented expulsion from Ethiopia Receive email alerts News May 18, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Ethiopia Reporters Without Borders wrote today to Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi calling for the release of two journalists who were arrested in June, Reyot Alemu and Wubeshet Taye, and for an investigation into the conditions in which they have been held. Reyot, a young woman columnist, is in very poor health, while Wubeshet, the deputy editor of a weekly, says he has been mistreated.“The situation of both of these journalists is alarming,” the letter to the prime minister says. “We were very disturbed to learn that their pre-trial detention was extended yet again and we call for their immediate release.“We also believe that Mr. Wubeshet’s claims should be taken seriously and we urge the Ethiopian authorities to carry out a thorough and independent investigation with the aim of establishing whether he has indeed been mistreated while in detention. If he has, those responsible should be brought to justice and reprimanded accordingly. We would like to remind you that you have a duty to ensure that detainees are treated humanely, have access to medical care and enjoy all the rights that the Ethiopian Constitution guarantees them.”When they were brought before a judge on 17 August, their pre-trial detention was extended for another 28 days. Accused of complicity with a political group that has been classified as a “terrorist” organization, they are due to appear in court again on 8 or 9 September.The deputy editor of the Awramba Times weekly, Wubeshet was arrested on 19 June. When he appeared before a federal court two months later, he said he was beaten during interrogation and was manhandled by prison officials. He was also forbidden to receive visits from his family and to organize his defence with his lawyer.Reyot, a columnist for the Amharic-language weekly Fitih, was arrested on 21 June. The equipment and material that was seized at the time of her arrest was finally returned to her family a few days ago. The few visitors that have been allowed to see her are worried by the rapid deterioration in her health. After two months in detention, this young woman is showing signs of physical and psychological trauma. Although her family has been able to send her medicine, she is in urgent need of proper medical attention.More information Journalist attacked, threatened in her Addis Ababa homelast_img read more


New Tajik legislation hampers coronavirus coverage


first_img Journalist loses accreditation over report about Tajikistan’s president May 14, 2021 Find out more November 6, 2020 Find out more Credit: Rjruiziii / CC BY-SA Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for the withdrawal of newly approved legislative amendments in Tajikistan under which false or inaccurate Covid-19 coverage would be subject to heavy fines. This could lead to censorship and other abuses, RSF warns.Under the amendments to the Administrative Code voted by the Tajik parliament on 10 June, anyone providing  “false” or “inaccurate” information about Covid-19 in the media or on social media could be fined up to 1,160 somoni (995 euros) – nearly twice the minimum monthly wage.“This new, vaguely defined legislation could be exploited to violate the right to information,” said Jeanne Cavelier, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk. “Under international law, nothing ever justifies giving a public authority the power to decide what is true or false, or – without reference to a judge – to restrict the right of a person or media to freedom of expression on the grounds that what they say might be false or inaccurate. We call for the withdrawal of these amendments, which violate freedom of the press and expression.”One of first targets of these amendments could be Kvtj.info, a website founded by civil society representatives that is keeping a tally of the number of Covid-19 deaths in Tajikistan, a tally verified by journalists based abroad. Its latest tally is 430, as against the official figure of 49. The site has been blocked within Tajikistan since 11 May.Despite a surge in the number of pneumonia deaths, the authorities denied that the epidemic had reached Tajikistan until 30 April, 24 hours before a visit by a delegation from the World Health Organization. After just one month of lockdown, as against that the three that are usual in better equipped countries, the authorities now say the epidemic is under control and are preparing to loosen it.RSF recommends that the Tajik authorities should combat disinformation by means of self-regulatory mechanisms that promote the best journalists standards and ethics, such as the Journalism Trust Initiative. Launched by RSF and its partners, the JTI is a set of standards for reliable, trustworthy journalism with indicators that allow individual media outlets to assess themselves, to improve their practices to satisfy the standards, and to publish their evaluation results. The standards covered range from transparency of media ownership and revenue sources to correction procedures and other good practices.Tajikistan is ranked 161st out of 180 countries and territories in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. News News RSF_en Follow the news on Tajikistan TajikistanEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsOnline freedoms Covid19Freedom of expressionJudicial harassment Help by sharing this information to go further News News June 12, 2020 New Tajik legislation hampers coronavirus coverage August 25, 2020 Find out more #CollateralFreedom: RSF unblocks eight sites censored during pandemic TajikistanEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsOnline freedoms Covid19Freedom of expressionJudicial harassment Receive email alerts Tajikistan imposes total control over independent broadcast media Organisation last_img read more


Sham trial ends in two-year jail term for Cambodian fixer


first_imgThis is not the first time that Prime Minister Hun Sen’s government has tried to silence people who raise such issues. The American NGO Agape International Missions was banned from Cambodia in August 2017, one month after CNN broadcast a documentary on the child sex trade in Cambodia for which one of the NGO’s representatives served as guide. News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for the withdrawal of all charges against Rath Rott Mony, a Cambodian fixer whose only crime was helping a visiting crew from the Russian state-owned TV network RT (formerly called Russia Today) to make a documentary about child prostitution in Cambodia. “The decision that is taken by Kao Sao, the judge hearing the case against Rath Rott Mony, will have major implications for the Cambodian justice system’s credibility,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. RSF published a report in October 2017 about fixers – “reporting’s unseen facilitators” –and the crucial role they play in enabling journalists to go much further in their reporting when in unfamiliar terrain all over the world. to go further “Unseen facilitators” December 28, 2020 Find out more It enraged the Cambodian government so much that Rath Rott Mony fled to Thailand to seek asylum, but was arrested by the Thai police in Bangkok on 7 December and was handed back to the Cambodian authorities five days later. RSF_en “Judicial sham” CambodiaAsia – Pacific Protecting sources Organized crimeImprisonedWhistleblowersJudicial harassment Help by sharing this information Organisation Rath Rott Mony is seen during his transfer from Prey Sarr prison to the Phnom Penh Municipal Court for trial based on trumped-up charges. The verdict will be announced in one week (photo: Reuters). The prosecution case’s other big flaw is treating Rath Rott Mony as the documentary’s co-producer, a claim repeatedly denied by RT.  It was denied again in a recent email to the Cambodian embassy in Moscow from RT’s head of documentaries Ekaterina Yakovleva, who said he was hired solely as a “fixer and interpreter” and had no control over the documentary’s narrative. She also said RT had authorizations signed by all the people who appeared in it. Follow the news on Cambodia June 19, 2019 – Updated on June 26, 2019 Sham trial ends in two-year jail term for Cambodian fixer Cambodia is ranked 143rd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. Cambodian journalist gets 20 months in jail for livestream February 24, 2021 Find out more Described by the authorities as the documentary’s co-producer and accused by interior ministry spokesman Khieu Sopheak of buying stories and broadcasting “fake news insulting the nation,” Rath Rott Mony is facing up to three years in prison and the possibility of being ordered to pay up to 50,000 dollars in damages to plaintiffs produced by the prosecution. RSF decries Cambodian plan for Chinese-style “Great Firewall” Receive email alerts News Google experiments drop Australian media from search results “What with police manipulation of witnesses, disregard of the evidence and arguments submitted by the defence, and bias in favour of the prosecution, it is time to end this judicial sham and free Rath Rott Mony. His only crime was helping to shed light on a subject of public interest.” Rath Rott Mony’s wife, Long Kim Heang (left), told RSF her husband’s case is an act of intimidation against those who dare investigate issues the government deems forbidden (photo : Kann Vichelka / VOA Khmer).The prosecution’s case is based above all on the testimony of five persons claiming that Rath Rott Mony paid them to appear in the documentary. But the genuineness of these testimonies is questionable. Rath Rott Mony’s wife, Long Kim Heang, told RSF: “In my view, the people who filed complaints against my husband were clearly pressured or threatened into doing it. His arrest and the charges brought against him are just a way for the government to intimidate other media outlets, so that they don’t talk about undesirable subjects.” —————————————————————————-UpdateIn a shocking decision today, a Cambodian court sentenced media fixer Rath Rott Mony to two years in prison after convicting him of “incitement to discriminate.” RSF condemns this iniquitous conclusion to a sham trail and calls for his conviction to be overturned on appeal because of all the inconsistencies in the case against him. —————————————————————————-After being detained for more than six months, he is due to receive the verdict in his trial in one week’s time, on 26 June. The prosecution accuses him of “defaming Cambodia” by helping RT during the filming of “My Mother Sold Me,” a documentary that RT broadcast in October 2018. January 21, 2021 Find out more News CambodiaAsia – Pacific Protecting sources Organized crimeImprisonedWhistleblowersJudicial harassment Newslast_img read more




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