State Highlights Calif Fines Three Insurers For Denying Therapy


first_imgState Highlights: Calif. Fines Three Insurers For Denying Therapy A selection of health policy stories from California, Colorado, Kansas and Florida.Los Angeles Times: State Says 3 Health Insurers Denied Medically Necessary TherapyCalifornia officials said three of the state’s largest health insurers illegally denied speech and occupational therapy to patients, and regulators fined one of the companies, Health Net Inc., $300,000 for repeated violations. The state Department of Managed Health Care said Monday that it ordered Health Net, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield of California to stop denying medically necessary therapy in cases of developmental disabilities, autism and other medical conditions (Terhune, 11/18).Health Policy Solutions (a Colo. news Service): Struggling In The Red, Denver Health Cuts 170 JobsA loss of $7 million so far this year and fewer hospital patients have prompted Denver Health to cut 170 jobs. Often cited as a national leader in providing top-notch, low-cost health care for the poor, Denver Health also now faces a new penalty under the Affordable Care Act. Denver Health managers are calculating exactly how big that hit will be — perhaps around $500,000 — but federal Medicare managers are penalizing 1,500 hospitals across the country for not meeting various new quality measures, including low marks from patients (Kerwin McCrimmon, 11/18).Los Angeles Times: O.C. Ambulance Company Pays $3 Million To Settle Fraud SuitAn Orange County ambulance company has paid $3.05 million to settle a lawsuit alleging that it billed Medicare and other federal health care programs to transport patients who didn’t need an ambulance, federal prosecutors said. The suit was filed on behalf of the United States by two former employees of Lynch Ambulance, which is based in Anaheim, under whistle-blower provisions of the federal False Claims Act, according to a written statement by the U.S. attorney’s Central District of California office (Esquivel, 11/18).Kansas Health Institute: KanCare Open Enrollment ApproachesOpen enrollment for thousands of the state’s KanCare enrollees will start Dec. 1 and run through March 2, 2014, state Medicaid officials announced today. Enrollment packets are being put in the mail and members can expect to receive them by the end of the month, officials at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment said in a prepared statement (11/18).Miami Herald: HIV-Disclosure Law Sparks Unique Legal Battle In  FloridaIn Florida, and almost three dozen other states, it is a crime to have intercourse without disclosing a sexually transmitted disease. So prosecutors thought they had a solid case when they charged a Manatee County woman who failed to tell her female partner that she was HIV-positive (Ovalle, 11/18).I-News/Health Policy Solutions (a Colo. news service): Mental Health Funding Cuts Fueled Homelessness In ColoradoThe president of the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, John Parvensky, says there are many more like Maseros who want help but can’t get it. His organization stopped carrying a waiting list for mental health services when it reached 2,000 people. Parvensky believes there is a straight line between the decrease in funding for mental health – and especially the decline in inpatient capacity – and the increase in homelessness in Colorado (Jones, 11/18).California Healthline: Innovation, Policy Outlook For AutismA Senate select committee last week held a hearing in Santa Ana to examine a successful public-private autism research and treatment partnership in Orange County, and to see what legislation might be needed for autism care in the next year. Lou Correa (D-Santa Ana) is a member of the Senate Select Committee on Autism and Related Disorders and chaired the Santa Ana hearing. … One part of the solution is the autism work that’s been done within the public Children and Families Commission of Orange County and the private not-for-profit Thompson Center for Autism, Correa said (Gorn, 11/18). California Healthline: More Changes Coming For California’s Disparate County Health SystemsCalifornia’s 58 counties, each operating its own health system under an established set of rules over the past several decades, are undergoing fundamental shifts in how they provide health care for low-income residents. The rules are changing. The two biggest vehicles of change are the Affordable Care Act and its Medicaid expansion. In addition, the relationship between state and county governments in California is being realigned, shifting responsibility and funding for physical and mental health care (Lauer, 11/18).California Health Report: Public Mental Health Centers Face New Competition Under ACAThe small changes also have big implications for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health. Under the Affordable Care Act, health plans are now required to provide mental health services. That means the newly insured, even the low income, will have the option to seek care anywhere they want, even outside the county health system (Abram, 11/18). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more


MNsure Picks Deloitte To Revamp Exchange


first_img This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. MNsure Picks Deloitte To Revamp Exchange Other state developments include the District of Columbia’s decision to extend enrollment until April 30, New York’s announcement that nearly 1 million residents enrolled in coverage  and a Georgia report that only about half of the 220,000 enrollees in that state have paid their first month’s premiums.Pioneer Press: MNsure Chooses New Vendor To Oversee Website Fixes For help figuring out how to fix its troubled website, MNsure is paying $4.95 million to a New York firm that has successfully created health insurance exchanges in four other states. Deloitte LLP designed and developed online insurance marketplaces that are working relatively well in Connecticut, Kentucky, Rhode Island and the state of Washington, state officials said (Snowbeck, 4/16).Minnesota Public Radio: Deloitte Named To Revamp MNsure ExchangeMNsure’s board of directors has hired a new general contractor to revamp its troubled health insurance exchange at a cost of nearly $5 million. Deloitte Consulting, Minnesota’s original choice to build MNsure will oversee the $100 million project for the next nine months. MNsure interim CEO Scott Leitz says Deloitte has two key responsibilities: to advise agency leaders on how much of the current system can be salvaged for the future and to make the site operate as well as it can currently (Stawicki, 4/16). The Associated Press: DC Extends Deadline To Enroll In Health PlansMore than 2,000 District of Columbia residents either enrolled in a health insurance plan or were found to be eligible for Medicaid after the official end of open enrollment on March 31, but a spike in call volume this week led to another extension of the deadline, officials said Wednesday. The district was one of a handful of states that joined President Barack Obama’s administration in offering a grace period into April for people who started applications but didn’t finish them by the end of March (4/16).The Associated Press: New York Says 960,000 Enrolled In Health Exchange More than 960,000 New Yorkers signed up for health insurance through the state exchange, officials said Wednesday. About 94,000 of those finished applying in the two weeks after the original March 31 deadline, according to figures released by the exchange’s executive director, Donna Frescatore. That leaves the program about 140,000 shy of a goal of 1.1 million enrollees by 2016, a sign of the public’s “tremendous interest” in it, Frescatore said (4/16).The Oregonian: Oracle Blasts Oregon For Spreading Cover Oregon ‘False Narrative’Oracle Corp. has accused the state of Oregon of misleading the press and the public with a “false narrative” about who’s at fault for the state’s health exchange technology disaster. Oracle President Safra Catz said in a letter to Cover Oregon that the state, and not Oracle, deserves blame. The state made the decision to serve as its own systems integrator (Manning, 4/16). Georgia Health News: Georgia Exchange Applications Hit 220,000Georgia insurers received more than 220,000 applications for health coverage in the Affordable Care Act’s exchange as of the official federal deadline of March 31, state officials said Wednesday. Insurance Commissioner Ralph Hudgens, though, said premiums have been received for only 107,581 of those policies, which cover 149,465 people. “Many Georgians completed the application process by the deadline, but have yet to pay for the coverage,” Hudgens said in a statement Wednesday (Miller, 4/16). last_img read more


Xbox One controllers will work on Project Scarlett – Microsoft pulls a


first_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Microsoft has confirmed current generation Xbox One controllers and peripherals will work on its newly unveiled Project Scarlett, Xbox 2 console.The news was revealed in a statement sent to Windows Central on Monday. The statement reported Partner Director of Program Management at Xbox, Jason Ronald confirmed:“All your accessories are compatible moving forward as well. If you go and buy an Elite Wireless Controller or Series Two Controller that will be forward compatible on the Scarlett.”This means all current Xbox One compatible headsets and third party controllers should theoretically work on the new consoles. This is a marked turn around on the strategy Microsoft took when launching the Xbox One.The Xbox One used a different connection type to the Xbox 360’s peripherals, effectively making older controllers and wireless headsets glorified paperweights when the current-gen console launched.Related: PS5 vs Xbox 2Project Scarlett, commonly referred to as the Xbox 2, was unveiled at Microsoft’s E3 2019 keynote on Sunday. The console is designed to take on the PS5 when the two consoles launch. The Xbox 2 is set to be released at an unspecified point in “the holiday season 2020”.Specific details are limited at the moment outside of the fact it will be based off AMD tech and capable of 8K, variable refresh rate gaming with ray tracing. The feature set is on par with what we currently know about the PS5.The console’s pricing and exact design haven’t been revealed though it will likely have its own new controller at launch, we just don’t know what it looks like yet. Microsoft has also been tight lipped about what Xbox 2 games will be available at launch. The only confirmed launch title we have is Halo Infinite.Microsoft unveiled a second generation Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2 alongside Project Scarlett. The controller is being marketed as the “most advanced” gamepad available and is designed for “pro” and hardcore gamers.last_img read more


Watch Teslas new Navigate on Autopilot feature in v9 at work


With its new version 9 software, Tesla is releasing its first major new Autopilot feature in a long time: Navigate on Autopilot.Now we get to see the new feature at work for the first time. more…The post Watch Tesla’s new Navigate on Autopilot feature in v9 at work appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forward


Fords Next EV Is A … Scooter


first_imgE-scooters at Purdue are sweet as jelly Scooters appearing on campus are part of a four-week engineering research projectWEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — There’s Jelly all over the place at Purdue.Not the sticky spread, but a new e-scooter brand with a goofy name. And university officials are thrilled to see them. Seriously.That’s because Jelly isn’t just yet another e-scooter brand, but the name given to a a campus-wide research project on best practices for using e-scooters. This is thought to be the first academic research to study how the oft-maligned e-scooters can best be incorporated into an urban environment.In the coming weeks, 40 scooters will be distributed across Purdue’s campus to begin the initial four-week research project. The research project is being led by Darcy Bullock, Purdue’s Lyles Family Professor of Civil Engineering and director of the Joint Transportation Research Program, which is operated out of Purdue’s Discovery Park.Aaron Madrid, alternative transportation coordinator at Purdue, said e-scooters, if used properly, have the potential to reduce traffic congestion, free up parking, and reduce the amount of climate- influencing pollutants into the air.“E-scooters are a nice, green transportation choice that helps address the ‘last mile’ problem in high population density environments where many people use public transit or park on the outer edge,” Madrid said. “The scooters are already safer than motor vehicles, but this research will help us learn more about how to make their use even safer.”Although the research results are intended to be used by civil engineering and city planners worldwide, Madrid said Purdue will be using the information for future decisions about whether to allow scooters on campus and how they should be used.“Any city planner or engineer looking for information on e-scooters has probably only seen negative news stories about companies dumping scooters in a city and creating chaos, or a sales pitch from one of the companies,” Madrid said. “To have actual data about what does and does not work well will be invaluable.”To begin using the scooters, riders must first download the Jelly app from the Apple App Store. For this initial four-week portion of the project, the app is available only for Apple iOS. Anyone on campus can use the scooters, including campus visitors.The app will show where scooters are located on campus and offer information on how to begin riding.Cassie McKee, a senior civil engineering major who is working on the research project, already rides a longboard on campus, but she said she’s eager to see another transportation option.“They’re fun, and the students like them,” she said. “But as a civil engineering student, I’m hoping people will use them in an appropriate way. For example, it really annoys me when I see someone leave one so that it blocks the ADA ramp on a sidewalk.”Madrid said that the same rules and laws apply for e-scooters as for bicycles. They are not to be ridden on sidewalks or inside buildings, but they can safely be ridden on local bike infrastructure or multi-use paths.He adds that if the e-scooters are ridden on the road, riders must operate them just as if they were driving a vehicle.“Whether you are on a bicycle or an e-scooter, if you are operating it in the road — which the law allows — you have to obey all traffic laws. That means you have to stop at stop signs, wait in line at red lights, and use front and rear lights when it’s dark,” Madrid says.“I should also remind other users of the road that scooters and bicycles are 100 percent allowed to use the road. You should not swerve at them, pass them in an unsafe manner, or yell and harass them. If you think the bicyclist or scooter rider is violating the law, you should inform the police. Let them handle the issue.” Currently, the electric scooter startup seems to still be in stealth mode, but is involved in a research project on the campus of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana.   According to a press release (reprinted in full below) from the school, the research intends to investigate “best practices for using e-scooters.” Despite the devices being all over U.S. cities in a mad scramble for market share, the school says the study is “thought to be the first academic research to study how the oft-maligned e-scooters can best be incorporated into an urban environment.” The University will see 40 of the Jelly scooters dropped off around the campus over the next few weeks.Interestingly, the connection to Ford is not mentioned in that official press release. That relationship was uncovered by Reddit user Labtec901, who posted about the nascent effort, mentioning he had spotted the automaker’s name on the rental agreement documents.This wouldn’t be Ford’s first foray into the scooter world. Last year, it joined forces with  OjO Electric, which offers an upscale machine for $1,999. Though it looks like a pretty sweet ride for a scooter, it’s probably fair to say that it hasn’t had a huge impact on the world of mobility. Maybe this new, low-key approach will hit the proper notes to turn this effort into the kind of success that will make its competitors Jelly. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 29, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Ford OjO Commuter Scooters Priced From $1,999.99 – Video Hot or Not? The Miku Max e-Scooter Has Polarizing Look Is Ford Jelly of Lime?Scooters are a big deal right now. Not the traditional Vespa sort (sadly), but the stand-up electric kind. The kind companies like Lime, Bird, and others have been carpet bombing American cities with over the past year.  The idea is, you can pick up one of the light mobility devices scattered about the town, hop on and drive it where you need to go, then leave it. Payment is handled via an app. They’ve become so popular it looks like the automotive giant Ford may be getting in on the two-wheel action. The automaker is apparently behind a new outfit called Jelly.More scooter stories Yamaha And Gogoro Team Up To Build Battery-Swapping e-Scooter Source: The Verge, Perdue University Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more


Kymco Goes Super Electric With Radical SuperNEX


first_img Jaguar Enters Electric Motorcycle Biz With Arc Vector A sexy bike with a brain.Kymco is better known for its cheap and accessible scooters and tiny motorcycles. The company has also recently been pushing the electric envelope by releasing a new electric scooter model and developing a standardized ev battery protocol. The company is now taking things even further with the introduction of its very first, fully-electric superbike. Shown for the first time in Milan, the SuperNEX is a sexy beast with an elegant philosophy.More E-Bikes Harley-Davidson Livewire Debuts At EICMA The Husqvarna EE5 Gets Electric Bikes Dirty Source: Electric Vehicle News Already a week ago, the company teased that it was working on something pretty significant, sharing a one-minute video recorded at the SBK event in Magny-Cours. That was a pretty big hint as to what was coming to EICMA on November 6, when the Taiwanese brand lifted the veil on its latest electric venture.Kymco means some serious business with the SuperNEX and doesn’t plan on staying in the sandbox and coloring between the lines. First off, if you’re into sportsbike, the NEX is an undeniably sexy-looking bike with a striking s-shape silhouette and futuristic-looking LED headlights.The NEX is a proper superbike with an expected top speed of 155 mph, able to do the 0-to-60 in under 3 seconds. Obviously, these insane figures are outside most riders’ comfort zone, that being said, Kymco will throw in the Full Engagement Performance (FEP) system which is a form of launch control feature that helps even the less experienced riders have a perfect take off.The coolest thing about the NEX, though, is the philosophy behind its design. The team at Kymco wanted to create an electric motorcycle that kept the essence of a motorcycle by adding the elements that make riding so satisfying: the sound of the engine and the engaging gear-change. This is why though it technically doesn’t need a transmission, the SuperNEX does have 6 gears—no clutch though. To enhance the rider’s experience, the e-sportsbike is also fitted with an Activ Acoustic Motor which produces the sound of a revving engine and hiccups when the gears are changed.Though the model shown at EICMA was more of a prototype, Kymco looks pretty serious about sending the bike to production and I fully support that. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 8, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more


Startup Curtiss Motorcycles Launches Crowdfunding


first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 27, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Curtiss Motorcycles Unveils “V8” Electric Zeus Get in on the ground floor of Curtiss for $1,000Curtiss Motorcycles has shown quite a few neat looking customs and prototypes over the years, but now seek to start full production on their Zeus electric bikes. To that end, they launched a crowdfunding campaign on the business focused site WeFunder, offering investors a minimum of 5,000 shares for $1,000, but only paying a return if they are successful at a future date. While we would be hesitant to drop that much on a bet that these high end electric cruisers will sell at a profit, according to their page they have already raised nearly $1.7 million from just nine investors.More E-Bikes While a startup motorcycle company is very high risk from a business standpoint, and the sting of SKULLY’s crowdfunded flame-out still fresh, Curtiss does have some advantages. The principles spun the new electric motorcycle company from the old high end custom motorcycle maker Confederate, which delivered more than 1,000 bikes over the years. The electric power train is being developed with components and input from Zero, the most successful electric bike make around right now.However, there are still some serious reservations to consider. Neither of the two recently unveiled Zeus models, the bobber, and the cafe racer, are anywhere near federal DOT legal as shown. There were no mirrors, turn signals, or reflectors, and little in the way of other lighting either, plus no license plate. From a technology standpoint it is hard to see how they manage to squeeze a 280 miles range into a motorcycle, especially when the Zero (with half the power) maxes out at just over 200 miles. From a simple engineering standpoint, it is hard to understand why they would use such an extreme angle on the swing arm and how they will minimize squat with 145 pound-feet of torque pulling on the belt. Curtiss Teases Zeus Electric Motorcycle In Video Reminding Us To “Do It” Curtiss Zeus Concept Becomes A Bobber And A Cafe Racerlast_img read more


Honda To Launch 20 Electrified Cars In China By 2025


first_imgHe also revealed the on-going planning for technology upgrade. Following the EVERUS VE-1, the SPORT EV platform will generate its second model, which will be used for car-sharing service from 2019. Besides, the EV models jointly developed by Dongfeng Honda and Honda Motor China Technology Co., Ltd. will be launched this year.The Japanese automaker is ready to further expand the product matrix featuring Honda’s Sport Hybrid i-MMD (Intelligent Multi-Mode Drive) system. In addition, the i-MMD-based plug-in hybrid system will be introduced in China next year.He also added that Honda is developing the upgraded version of the “Honda SENSING” ADAS system designed to cope with various complex road conditions, which will be sent into road tests next year under China’s actual traffic scenarios.Additionally, the automaker will have its Honda CONNECT in-car system seamlessly interconnected with mobile phones and smart home applications and upgrade itself via OTA (Over-The-Air).In 2018, a total of seven Honda’s models including the tenth-generation Accord, the all-new Crider and the Civic had respective annual sales exceeding 100,000 units despite the overall car sales dwindle in China. Especially, the Civic becomes the first Honda-branded model whose full-year sales topping 200,000 units.Last year, Honda also gained some significant fruits in vehicle electrification in China. The SPORT HYBRID models carrying the i-MMD system have enjoyed popularity among consumers. For instance, the CR-V Hybrid made up over 20% of the CR-V sales in December 2018.Source: Gasgoo More Info On Tesla Model 3 Configuration In China Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 10, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Not necessarily plug ins though.Japanese automaker Honda plans to roll out over 20 electric models in its Chinese market by 2025 as an important part of its mid-term goal to expand electrified product lineup in this country, said Yusuke Hasagawa, Executive Vice President of Honda Motor (China) Investment Co.,Ltd. and Honda Motor China Technology Co., Ltd., at a press conference on January 7.More China News Great Wall Motors Sells Battery Manufacturing & Management Patents Source: Electric Vehicle News Geely Creates New Division For New Energy EVslast_img read more


Tesla Talking Batteries With Chinas Lishen Battery Supplier


first_img Tesla Gigafactory 3: Facts & Videos From Groundbreaking It’s high time for Tesla to develop a battery cell partnership in China.Recent news via Reuters suggests that Tesla will develop a partnership to supply batteries for its Chinese operations. Reportedly, the Silicon Valley automaker is talking with China’s Tianjin Lishen. If substantiated, Lishen will provide batteries for its upcoming Gigafactory 3 in Shanghai. Sadly, as usual, Reuters only published information from the usual “people familiar with the matter.”As it goes, the two companies have already come to an early agreement. However, Lishen has no idea what battery size Tesla will require, nor the amount of cells required at this point.Check Out These Tesla China Related Stories: Tesla’s Elon Musk Makes Impact In China, Offered Permanent Residency Of course, Reuters goes on to say that the “details of the agreement were unclear.” If you aren’t well aware, there has become an increasing trend in which mainstream news media covers Tesla and other EVs on a more regular basis. However, they seemingly have no “real” clue about what’s going on for sure. Instead, they just cover information gleaned from unnamed sources and call it news.The bottom line here is that Tesla most likely wants to deal with battery cell supply on a local level. This is critical as it moves forward with its Shanghai Gigafactory. At some point, one would assume the automaker — in partnership with a cell supplier — could move forward on its own, so to speak. But, just like the U.S. situation with Panasonic, an integrated cell supplier only makes sense. Nonetheless, Tesla told Reuters:We have not signed any agreement of any kind with them [Lishen].Lishen agreed that no contract or agreement is yet to be established.Still, Musk tweeted in November that Tesla would locally source battery cell production at Gigafactory 3. He also included that the situation would probably include Panasonic as a partner:Cell production will be sourced locally, most likely from several companies (incl Pana), in order to meet demand in a timely manner.Panasonic revealed that it’s considering the situation, but has come to no immediate decision.Source: Reuters Tesla Gigafactory 3 In China To Begin Production 2nd Half 2019 Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 22, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more


Teslas 35000 base Model 3 still doesnt exist


first_imgSource: Charge Forward Tesla’s base Model 3 with a promised price of $35,000 was already late when the automaker launched it a month ago, but it still doesn’t exist and Tesla is being weird about it. more…The post Tesla’s $35,000 base Model 3 still doesn’t exist appeared first on Electrek.last_img


Teslas value will grow 10x to 500 billion due to its selfdriving


first_imgAt Tesla’s Investor Autonomy Day last week, Elon Musk laid out the automaker’s plan when it comes to self-driving, but now the CEO attaches a valuation prediction to it as the company attempts to raise over $2 billion. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8COKnXNH-EThe post Tesla’s value will grow 10x to $500 billion due to its self-driving tech, says Elon Musk appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img


Robson gives angry fans the slip but his number may be up


first_imgSoccer Reuse this content Championship Shares11 Share on Twitter Share via Email Share on Twitter news Robson gives angry fans the slip but his number may be up Sheffield United Topics Simon Burnton at Bramall Lane This article is more than 11 years old Sun 10 Feb 2008 19.01 EST Share on WhatsAppcenter_img Share on Facebook First published on Sun 10 Feb 2008 19.01 EST Share on LinkedIn An hour and a half after the final whistle hundreds of fans remained outside the ground noisily demanding that Bryan Robson be sacked. In many ways they rather resembled the team that had once again disappointed them: a disorganised, unhappy rabble whose efforts were never likely to be met with immediate reward.Robson remains, for the moment, employed but his position is only slightly more secure than his car, which needed a phalanx of guards on Saturday to stop angry fans from trying further to personalise the number plate. Eventually it was driven to safety by an aide, as indeed was Robson when he departed, silently, in the green Beetle belonging to the wife of his assistant, Brian Kidd.Kevin McCabe, chairman of Sheffield United plc, was fortunate enough to miss the game but later telephoned a local radio station to assure listeners that he intended to “deal with the situation with a cool head and success in mind”, a statement which can hardly be interpreted as a vote of confidence.Billy Sharp’s second-half header, which thumped against the post, was as close as the Blades got to beating a below-strength Scunthorpe side reduced to 10 men in the ninth minute. It was a performance every bit as wretched as the result it secured.”What you’ve got to do in these situations”, said Gary Speed after the game, “is get hold of the ball and be prepared to make a mistake.” By that criterion United are performing admirably – they were not just prepared to make mistakes but also absolutely determined to carry that threat through. This was a festival of unforced errors, every gaffe magnified by the understated efficiency of Scunthorpe’s performance and the swelling, simmering ire of the home fans.The referee, Rob Styles, who gave Liverpool a debatable, decisive penalty in his last visit here on the first day of last season, was the first to feel their anger. His questionable decision to send off Grant McCann improved his popularity but long before the end he had been forgotten as abuse poured from the stands towards Robson and his team.”We know what the fans here are like,” said Jim Goodwin, who was intelligent and energetic in the Scunthorpe midfield. “They’ve got high expectations, and rightly so – they’re paying some top players some top money. On paper Sheffield United should be battering us really.””It is difficult playing in front of our fans,” said Matthew Kilgallon. “They just want us to win every game and get a bit moody if we don’t.” Though United have lost only one of their last eight in all competitions, they are 17th in the league and clearly it will not be just the fans getting moody if they do not secure more victories soon. On this form it is hard to see one coming from tomorrow’s trip to West Bromwich or Sunday’s visit of Middlesbrough in the FA Cup. One day McCabe may have to choose between keeping success in mind and keeping Robson in work.Man of the match Jim Goodwin (Scunthorpe United) @Simon_Burnton Share on Facebook Championship 2007-08 Share via Email This article is more than 11 years old Share on Pinterest Scunthorpe Share on Messenger Soccerlast_img read more


Gollob claims Danish win but Pedersen stays in front


first_imgFirst published on Sun 15 Jun 2008 19.01 EDT Speedway Jeremy Alexander Share on Twitter Gollob claims Danish win but Pedersen stays in front Sun 15 Jun 2008 19.01 EDT Topics Support The Guardian Share on Facebook Shares00 Share via Email Since you’re here… … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Tomasz Gollob became the first rider to win two world championship races this year when he took the Danish grand prix in Copenhagen, denying Nicki Pedersen a first win in his home event. By reaching the final of all four races, though, the Dane leads the overall standings by 11 points from the Pole.Indeed, such is the virtue of consistency through the heats, too, that overall Pedersen, the reigning champion, took a point more from the event than Gollob did for winning it. Britain’s riders did not fare well, Scott Nicholls finishing 10th and Chris Harris 15th. Both will be looking to raise their game in the next round, at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff on June 28. Speedwaylast_img read more


What You Need To Know From Q1


first_imgThis post provides a summary of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement activity and related developments from the first quarter of 2018.DOJ Enforcement (Corporate)The DOJ brought one corporate FCPA enforcement action in the first quarter. DOJ recovery in this action was $2 million million. Transport Logistics Int’l (March 13th)See here for the prior postCharges: Conspiracy to violate the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisionsResolution Vehicle: Criminal information resolved through a deferred prosecution agreementGuidelines Range: $28.5 million to $57 millionPenalty: $21.4 million reduced to $2 million based on inability to payOrigin: Unclear from the resolution documentsMonitor: No.Individuals Charged: YesDOJ Enforcement (Individual)The DOJ brought two core individual actions in the first quarter against three individuals.As highlighted here, in connection with its long-standing Russia nuclear bribery scheme enforcement action (the same core action as the Transport Logistics Int’l enforcement action and prior individual enforcement actions) the DOJ announced criminal charges against Mark Lambert.As highlighted here, in connection with is long-standing PDVSA bribery scheme enforcement action, the DOJ announced criminal FCPA charges against Luis Carlos De Leon Perez and Nervis Gerardo Villalobos Cardenas.SEC Enforcement (Corporate)The SEC brought two corporate FCPA enforcement actions in the first quarter. SEC recovery in these actions was approximately $1.5 million.Kinross Gold (March 26th)See here for the prior postCharges:  None.  Administrative cease and desist order finding violations of FCPA’s books and records and internal controls provisions.Settlement: $950,000 civil penaltyOrigin: SEC subpoenaIndividuals Charged: NoRelated DOJ Enforcement Action: NoElbit Imaging (March 9th)See here for the prior postCharges:  None.  Administrative cease and desist order finding violations of FCPA’s books and records and internal controls provisions.Settlement: $500,000 civil penalty (an amount reflective of the fact that Elbit is currently winding down its operations).Origin: Voluntary disclosureIndividuals Charged: NoRelated DOJ Enforcement Action: NoSEC Enforcement (Individual)The SEC did not bring any individual enforcement actions in the first quarter.Other Developments or Items of InterestAs discussed in this post, the Supreme Court yet again rejected the DOJ’s overly expansive interpretation of a criminal law.As highlighted in this guest post, a UK court recently decided the first contested prosecution of a corporate for failing to prevent bribery under section 7 of the Bribery Act 2010.This guest post discusses corruption monitoring in France. Donate Support This Free Public Website FCPA Professor is widely regarded as a leading source of FCPA news and commentary. All of this takes time, money, and substantial effort. Thus, if FCPA Professor adds value to your practice or business, please consider a donation.last_img read more


CRISPRCas9 technique may raise cancer risk


first_img Source:https://ki.se/en/news/genome-editing-tool-could-increase-cancer-risk Jun 11 2018Therapeutic use of gene editing with the so-called CRISPR-Cas9 technique may inadvertently increase the risk of cancer, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and the University of Helsinki, Finland, published in Nature Medicine. Researchers say that more studies are required in order to guarantee the safety of these ‘molecular scissors’ for gene-editing therapies.CRISPR-Cas9 is a molecular machine first discovered in bacteria that can be programmed to go to an exact place in the genome, where it cuts the DNA. These precise ‘molecular scissors’ can be used to correct faulty pieces of DNA and are currently being used in clinical trials for cancer immunotherapy in the US and China. New trials are expected to be launched soon so as to treat inherited blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia.Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyLiving with advanced breast cancerAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsTwo independent articles published in the journal Nature Medicine now report that therapeutic application of the genome-editing tool may, in fact, increase the risk of cancer. In one of the studies, scientists from Karolinska Institutet and the University of Helsinki report that use of CRISPR-Cas9 in human cells in a laboratory setting can activate a protein known as p53, which acts as a cell’s ‘first aid kit’ for DNA breaks. Once active, p53 reduces the efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing. Thus, cells that do not have p53 or are unable to activate it show better gene editing. Unfortunately, however, lack of p53 is also known to contribute to making cells grow uncontrollably and become cancerous.”By picking cells that have successfully repaired the damaged gene we intended to fix, we might inadvertently also pick cells without functional p53″, says Dr Emma Haapaniemi, researcher at the Department of Medicine at Karolinska Institutet in Huddinge and co-first author of the study. “If transplanted into a patient, as in gene therapy for inherited diseases, such cells could give rise to cancer, raising concerns for the safety of CRISPR-based gene therapies.””CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful tool with staggering therapeutic potential”, adds Dr Bernhard Schmierer, researcher at the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics at Karolinska Institutet, and Head of the High Throughput Genome Engineering Facility of Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab), who co-supervised the study. “Like all medical treatments however, CRISPR-Cas9-based therapies might have side effects, which the patients and caregivers should be aware of. Our study suggests that future work on the mechanisms that trigger p53 in response to CRISPR-Cas9 will be critical in improving the safety of CRISPR-Cas9-based therapies.”last_img read more


Microglia play protective role in response to retinal detachment shows study


first_imgJun 19 2018A research team at Massachusetts Eye and Ear has shown that microglia, the primary immune cells of the brain and retina, play a protective role in response to retinal detachment. Retinal detachment and subsequent degeneration of the retina can lead to progressive visual decline due to photoreceptor cell death, the major light-sensing cell in the eye. In a report published online today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the researchers describe, for the first time, the beneficial role of microglial cells in the eye after retinal detachment -; migrating to the site of injury to protect photoreceptors and to regulate local inflammation.”Our results provide clear evidence that microglia protect photoreceptors from cell death in acute retinal detachment,” said senior author Kip Connor, Ph.D., vision researcher at Mass. Eye and Ear and Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. “We found that microglial cells rapidly migrate into the injured retina, where they formed close connections with infiltrating immune cells and removed injured photoreceptors. These findings provide the first insight into how microglia respond and function during retinal detachment.”Affecting about 200,000 Americans per year, retinal detachments are considered sight-threatening medical emergencies. When the retina detaches from its normal position, it separates the blood vessels that supply oxygen to the eye, and photoreceptors -; the major light-sensing cells of the retina -; begin to die away. Retinal detachments can occur spontaneously, as a result of blunt trauma or as a side effect of a variety of eye diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, ocular tumors, and age-related macular degeneration.The current standard of care for retinal detachment is surgical reattachment, with patients in the United States and Europe typically treated within one week. Today’s surgical techniques are highly effective in physically reattaching the retina, and – if surgery is timely – surgical outcomes are generally positive. However, in some cases, patients experience permanent vision loss accompanied by changes in color vision.Related StoriesSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryResearchers around the world -; across all fields of medicine -; have recently begun to shed light on the function of microglial cells in various conditions. In Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative diseases of the brain, they are thought to be harmful.In the ophthalmology setting, microglial cells have been known to be activated in retinal detachment; however, it was previously unknown if these cells were harmful or protective against photoreceptor cell death.In the PNAS report, the researchers describe morphological changes in microglia in response to retinal detachment in a preclinical model. In response to retinal detachment, microglia rapidly responded in a uniform migrating pattern, toward the affected area. When the researchers depleted microglia in the model, they saw more of the photoreceptor cells die away.The authors on the PNAS report are hopeful that these findings suggest a new therapeutic avenue for preserving photoreceptors after retinal detachment.”Clinically, in the context of retinal detachment, we think promoting these cells would be of significant therapeutic benefit -; perhaps early on, when they can keep inflammation in check,” said Yoko Okuniki, M.D., Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at Mass. Eye and Ear and the study’s lead author. “This could prevent the initial photoreceptor cell loss, preserving vision longer after retinal detachment and providing an extended therapeutic window for surgery.” Source:https://www.masseyeandear.org/news/press-releases/2018/06/microglia-protect-sensory-cells-needed-for-vision-after-retinal-detachmentlast_img read more


German Ethics Council Government Should Regulate Dangerous Research


The German government should step in with legislation to regulate so-called dual use research of concern (DURC), the type of science that can benefit mankind but may be dangerous in the wrong hands, says a report issued today by the German Ethics Council. The government should set up a national committee to review DURC proposals in advance, says the report. In addition, the panel says action is needed to raise awareness about the issue, both at home and internationally.Critics of dual-use research welcomed the call for tighter regulations. “This is an admirable, comprehensive, and compelling report,” says Peter Hale, founder of the Foundation for Vaccine Research in Washington, D.C., who has lobbied for limiting dual-use research. The document, “for the first time, contains a set of substantive recommendations that will hopefully inform/inspire debate and action in other countries,” Hale writes in an e-mail to ScienceInsider. “The report should be required reading for governments around the world.”Some scientists, however, say the recommendations place needless burdens on researchers and may hamper science. Lars Schaade, vice president of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) in Berlin, says he supports some of the council’s proposals, such as developing a code of conduct for German scientists and compulsory biosecurity training, but does not see the need for new legislation and a national DURC committee. “Local committees at universities can review DURC proposals just as efficiently,” Schaade says, “and they may have more support from scientists.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The German government had asked the  council to study the issue in the wake of the fierce debate over two studies a few years ago—one led by Ron Fouchier of Erasmus MC in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and the other by Yoshihiro Kawaoka at the University of Wisconsin, Madison—that sought to find out which genetic mutations make the H5N1 bird flu virus more easily transmissible between humans. Critics said that the studies, which were eventually published in Science and Nature, might help aspiring bioterrorists.The council’s 300-page report (PDF, in German; click here for a summary in English) says current regulations are insufficient. It says that German law should classify 10 types of research as DURC, such as studies that increase the transmissibility and infectious potential of a pathogen, expand its host range, make it more stable, or make it more difficult to detect.(That list is an expanded version of what researchers call the seven deadly sins, introduced in a landmark U.S. biosecurity report issued in 2004. The sins were ultimately formalized in several new sets of U.S. government rules requiring research funding agencies to screen proposals for DURC, and for researchers proposing certain kinds of DURC experiments to receive extra review from public funders. U.S. officials are also considering rules that would require universities to review DURC and develop plans for reducing risks.)In Germany, the council recommends that researchers be legally required to submit proposals to a new national DURC committee that would weigh the risks and benefits of the research; if rejected, the government and other funders should not support the work, it says.Stephan Becker, a virologist at the Philipps University of Marburg who has followed the debates closely, says he’s “impressed by the amount of work that went into this expert statement,” but not in favor of new laws to regulate scientists’ work. “Personally I do not believe that the demanded legislation will solve the problem,” Becker says. “In my opinion it is all about education, building of awareness, and communication.”RKI’s Schaade also objects to the idea, supported by some members of the council, to introduce an additional approval procedure, to be conducted by a federal authority such as RKI. RKI carries out research itself; getting involved in judging other researchers’ proposals might be regarded as a conflict of interest, he says. “What if we reject a proposal for some flu study and then a Robert Koch researcher gets a related study approved?” Schaade asks. “It would not be a good idea.”The council sees a guiding role for Germany internationally. Scientists and scientific organizations “should embark on an international process of reflection on the possible benefits and the risks of DURC,” the report says, and the government should try to reach an international agreement about DURC policy. Germany is also asked to lobby for DURC rules within the massive research programs of the European Union, with perhaps a DURC committee at the European level to review research proposals.The question is what the German government will do with the report. German science minister Johanna Wanka appeared noncommittal today. “We don’t want to immediately force something on the scientific community,” she was quoted as saying today by a website for physicians. “New legislation is the last link in the chain,” she said in the Süddeutsche Zeitung.That would be too bad, says virologist Simon Wain-Hobson of the Institut Pasteur in Paris, who testified before the council in August. “If virologists are unhappy, it is because they don’t want to face up to the changing world,” Wain-Hobson says. “We do need DURC committees.” read more


Spider Venom Inspires BeeSafe Pesticide


A new pesticide could be the bee’s knees. Honey bees (Apis mellifera, pictured) pollinate 90% of all U.S. flowering crops, but in recent years their numbers have drastically dwindled. Accumulating evidence implicates several commonly used insecticides in honey bee deaths, sparking a growing demand for bee-safe alternatives. Online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, a team of researchers reports the creation of a bee-friendly pesticide produced by fusing Australian funnel-web spider (Hadronyche versuta) venom with snowdrop flower (Galanthus nivalis) proteins. The team says its toxin selectively attacks the central nervous systems of common agricultural pests, such as beetles and aphids, while leaving honey bees unharmed. After exposing bees to their new pesticide for 7 days, the researchers found no detrimental effects on learning or survival. Even when the team directly injected the pesticide into the honey bees, only 17% died within 48 hours. The team next plans to test the toxin’s effect on other beneficial pollinators, such as bumblebees and parasitic wasps. read more


Withholding results from clinical trials is unethical says WHO


first_imgThe movement to ensure that clinical trial results don’t end up in drawers has found an important global ally. Today, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a call to make results from every clinical study publicly available within a year. Not doing so can harm patients and research subjects, waste time and money, and hold back medical science, WHO says.“Failure to publicly disclose trial results engenders misinformation, leading to skewed priorities for both R&D and public health interventions,” said Marie-Paule Kieny, an assistant-director at WHO, in a press statement today. “It creates indirect costs for public and private entities, including patients themselves, who pay for suboptimal or harmful treatments.”Clinical trials go unpublished for a variety of reasons. Sometimes a study’s sponsor prefers not to call attention to unwelcome results; sometimes researchers have trouble getting a journal to print their findings—for instance if they show a treatment had no effect; and sometimes scientists never get around to writing a manuscript. But withholding results leads to “publication bias,” which causes treatments to seem more or less effective than they really are, and it can put volunteers in future trials at risk unnecessarily. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In its statement, WHO says that from now on the main findings of every clinical study should be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal within 12 months after data collection ends and be published—in an open-access journal unless there is a specific reason why that’s impossible—within 24 months. “Main findings” may sound rather limited, but actually includes everything from trial design and eligibility criteria to the outcomes, limitations, and interpretation of a study. WHO refers researchers who want a checklist of what needs to be in a paper to the so-called CONSORT statement.In addition, WHO wants the “key outcomes”—a more limited data set including number of participants, key results, and adverse events—made available in a clinical trial registry such as ClinicalTrials.gov within 12 months after a study is completed. WHO also calls on the publication of the results from older studies that have never seen the light of day.”It’s unethical to conduct clinical research without reporting the results,” says Vasee Moorthy, an author of a paper about the new statement published in PLOS Medicine today. Europe and the United States have already made important regulatory strides to registering trials and making their outcomes public, Moorthy says; he hopes WHO’s statement will stimulate countries elsewhere to do the same.Ben Goldacre, a co-founder of the advocacy group AllTrials, praises WHO’s “landmark position statement” in another paper in PLOS Medicine, but says it’s not enough. To make sure that researchers follow WHO’s advice and fulfill their reporting obligations, Goldacre recommends independently conducted audits. For every trial entered in a trial registry more than 12 months ago, auditors can simply check whether the results have been published and post their findings. That “would allow us to name and shame poor performers, and also to reward best practice,” Goldacre writes.The requirement to publish in an academic journal may prove a red herring, Goldacre says, as journal articles are sometimes incomplete, wrong, or full of spin, and publication can take a long time. Reporting results in a structured database like ClinicalTrials.gov is speedier and often better, he argues.last_img read more